Upcoming Transgender Speaker Series in San Francisco

This weekend kicks off a two part speaker series of transgender filmmakers at the GLBT Historical Society  in San Francisco, CA.

I will be part of Monday’s panel showing a clip of my work and discussing my new film, PASSION. Below is more information about the event and I hope to see you there!

 

GLBT History Museum LogoGLBT Historical Society Logo

San Francisco – The GLBT History Museum will present ”Trans Forming Film: Transgender Filmmaking Past and Future,” a special two-part program of personal viewpoints from transgender independent filmmakers on Sunday, July 1, and Monday, July 2.

“Last year, a big-budget transgender-themed film made the headlines when Albert Nobbs with Glenn Close was nominated for Academy Awards,” said Lee Callahan, an organizer of the program who also serves as a docent at the museum. “But if we really want insights into transgender lives, independent films made by transgender directors can tell us so much more. The filmmakers on these two panels — many of whom have had their work screened at the Frameline International LGBT Film Festival — will offer an extended conversation about how images of transgender people in films have changed over time and will bring us up to date on what’s happening currently in independent trans film.”

The panels will include both established and emerging filmmakers, who will discuss their individual approaches to transgender representation and will offer critical perspectives on the ways film has portrayed transgender people. In addition, the participants will show clips from their own works, which reflect documentary, fiction and experimental genres.

Sunday, July 1, 5:00 – 7:00 p.m.

Morty Diamond (Trans Entities, 2008); Susan Stryker (Screaming Queens: The Riot at Compton’s Cafeteria, 2005); Texas (Gendernauts, 1999); Shawna Virago (Transsexual Dominatrix, 2011).

Monday, July 2, 7:00 – 9:00 p.m.

Sam Berliner (Genderbusters, 2010); Ewan Duarte (Spiral Transition, 2010); Aneesh Sheth (My Inner Turmoil, 2012); Dr. Kortney Ryan Ziegler (Still Black: A Portrait of Black Transmen, 2008).

 

Both panels will take place at The GLBT History Museum at 4127 18th St. in San Francisco’s Castro District. Admission is $5.00 (suggested donation). For more information, visit www.glbthistory.org.

 

How my past as a black woman informs my black male feminist perspective today

Although I am not new to masculinity, I am new to being a black man.

I am new to the experience of male privilege and its consequence of authority, as well as the disprivilege of race that marks my black male body as innately suspect. It is the delicate balance between power and criminal that has allowed me to see the machinations of misogyny in an entirely different light. Whereas black cisgender men have generally approached feminist discourse through the academic texts and writings of black women, for me, it is my lived experience as a black female that has shaped the ways in which I embrace and practice black feminism.

Prior to physical transition, I wasn’t naive to the ways in which certain forms of black masculinity contribute to the oppression of women. I grew up in a family of single black women who loved, really loved, black men even though it was their husbands, boyfriends and sometimes brothers who were the perpetrators of emotional and physical abuse.

I watched my mother, my beautiful mother, struggle with the demons of mental illness and drug use. Her sickness, it seemed, gave the men in the neighborhood free range to take advantage of her financially and sexually. Though I’ve never met him to form an opinion, my aunt still declares it was my absent father who literally drove my mother to madness.

I was witness to the sadness my grandmother felt as all three of her sons followed in their father’s alcoholic footsteps. She still smiled through all of the pain but I saw the sadness when my uncle, her child, routinely threatened her in the same ways as did the abusive husband she left years before.

I learned to resent black men.

As I grew and my body changed, so did my interactions with males that I encountered. I suffered the threat of sexual violence as my female body consistently invited unsolicited advances from (black) men despite my masculine presentation.

I became more aware of the ads, music, and propaganda that told me that I was ugly, unattractive, and good enough only as a sexual object for black men. Even though intro courses to race and women’s studies in college began to offer me the critical tools to somewhat reject these images, I still felt shame as it was impossible to escape the reality that sexist images of black women suffocated me.

When I began to date women, I repeatedly encountered the aggressive homophobe who thought their magical black dicks could turn me “straight.” In some instances, I would rebuff their advances with jokes though I was well aware of the possibility of danger in doing so.

I learned to fear black men.

Although my relationship with black men and masculinity was fraught, I still desired to be one; I knew that gender transition would be a necessary part of my life’s journey.

For some transmen, their female past conjures up memories of pain and humiliation, and rightfully so. These feelings are not absent from my journey but I’ve come to embrace my past as a beneficial asset to my practice of a progressive black masculinity.

Primarily, I am very careful with my interactions with women in order to not be perceived as a physical threat. I am always thoughtful of my newfound “bulk” due to hormones and the ways in which my masculine body moves and occupies space. While walking on the streets, I maintain my distance from women. I avoid eye contact unless we are engaging in mutual conversation and even then, I do not stare. The memory of harassment as a woman doesn’t allow me to.

In professional situations, I am always aware of my male privilege. I do not hog the intellectual space and make it a point to deeply value the input of my female collaborators. My goal is not to be the dominant voice of reason but to attempt to exist as an equal colleague. Furthermore, in my work I find it very important to centralize the experiences of women to supplement the work that they are doing for themselves.

Although I identify as a heterosexual male, in my relationship with my partner I strive to avoid replicating the harmful gendered dynamics that are traditionally associated with heterosexuality. I make it a point to share my feelings and evaluate my shortcomings. I am not perfect and sometimes I slip but the emphasis I’ve placed on expressing my feelings has provided a deviation from conventional notions of black masculinity. This gesture does not negate my manhood; rather it permits me to love and perform gender in a much healthier way.

Additionally, I do not use my manhood as an excuse to cheat, to view my partner as another sexual conquest, or to marginalize her feelings.

In my brief experience of living as a black male, I’ve learned that it is difficult to challenge misogyny in male dominated spaces. I have found myself in a number of uncomfortable situations with men who openly insult and humiliate women and I feel silenced. Not because of the fear of being outed as trans but I fear being perceived as a failed version of black masculinity–a fear that I believe imprisons all black men–adding to the reproduction of a violent patriarchal society.

I am not a perfect man. I am not immune to the assumptions that are expected of me and sometimes, I act them out. However, my transition journey has allowed me to begin the process of forgiving my absent father, my alcoholic uncle, and the cat-calling homophobe on the corner.

Because black feminism allows me to love myself, I have learned to love black men.

 

Kylar Broadus Interview from STILL BLACK

This past week, Kylar Broadus, lawyer, professor and Trans People of Color Coalition founder, made black queer history by being the first transgender identified person to testify before the Senate during a hearing on the Employee Non-Discrimination Act (EDNA). If passed, EDNA would ban discrimination against gender expression or sexual orientation in the workplace.

In his testimony, Kylar expressed the discrimination he faced during his stint with a large corporation. He spoke of the unease of his supervisors as "they were not prepared to deal with my transition to being a black man." This led to repeated harassment and an eventual firing.

Kylar: "To be unemployed is very devastating, also demeaning and demoralizing. And then the recovery time--there is no limit on it. I still have not financially recovered. I'm underemployed. When I do talks, I tell people I'm not employable. I was lucky to be where I am and I'm happy to be where I am, but I'm one of the fortunate people that is employed. There are many more people like me that are not employed as a result of just being who they are, being good workers, but being transgender or transsexual. So I think it's extremely important that this bill be passed to protect workers like me."

In honor of Kylar's history making testimony, I felt it appropriate and very necessary to share his complete interview from my 2008 documentary film, "STILL BLACK: a portrait of black tansmen."

Enjoy.

stillblackfilm.org